/ /

Modern Medicine News

Conjunctival chalasis, or conjunctivochalasis (Cch), is a commonly observed condition in our everyday patient care experiences. Because it is so common, and because a majority of patients are asymptomatic, optometrists seldom feel the need treat.
Times are changing, and the amount of information coming at us from all directions can easily be overwhelming. This information—whether true or false—is unrelenting and has increased in magnitude over the past five years. Part of it may be the natural progression of one’s career and the expansion of one’s network, but most of it is just the sheer volume that is at our fingertips.
I was born in Houston, moved to Dallas for two years at age 8, moved to Los Angeles for five years, then came back to Dallas. I went to Houston for college and moved back to Dallas 33 years ago when I graduated.
Is end-of-life planning truly necessary?
Is end-of-life planning truly necessary?Do you know what treatments your patients would want if they became seriously or even terminally ill?
Nominations are now open for any pediatrician making meaningful change to improve patient well-being or transforming their community into a healthier place for children. Whether it’s founding a local diaper bank, passionately testifying before a local legislature on an acute children’s need, or spearheading a YouTube literacy program, we want to hear about these outstanding doctors and make their works viral.
Why do we keep prescribing heroin to patients?
Why do we keep prescribing heroin to patients?Let us all remember when the pen hits the prescription pad to write for an opioid that heroin is an opioid, too.
Oral propranolol is prescribed for the most serious cases. In this Lancet review, experts highlight some considerations for treatment.
Dupliumab plus topical corticosteroids safe and effective after failure of cyclosporine in moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis
Early trial results show a significant reduction of itch with the oral NK-1 antagonist serlopitant
A 30-year-old female with a 16-year history of insulin-dependent diabetes and no other ocular or systemic conditions developed proliferative retinopathy in March 2015. She had not been closely followed for the previous five years.