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Stephen C. Schimpff, MD
It's about time PCPs say enough is enough
It's about time PCPs say enough is enough
It’s about time—time to recognize that primary care physicians (PCPs) need more time with their patients.
Hospitalists, PCPs bad at communication and its hurting patient care
The American health care delivery system is reaching a point of crisis.
United Airlines fiasco should be a healthcare wakeup call
United Airlines fiasco should be a healthcare wakeup call
The forcible removal of a passenger from the United Airlines flight has reminded flyers of their general dissatisfaction with the airline industry. Perhaps surprisingly, it should also be a stern warning to physicians
Primary care has lost its quarterback position in patient care
There is a crisis in primary care and it’s now flowing over into the hospital when a primary care physician’s (PCP) patient is admitted.
Will retail take over primary care?
Will retail take over primary care?
Walgreens and CVS pharmacy chains are aggressively developing primary care venues within their stores. Their approaches are similar yet different, although the underlying strategy is the same for both.
Here is the PCP crisis solution and it's simple
Here is the PCP crisis solution and it's simple
There is a primary care crisis in the United States. We know it because patients only get 8-12 minutes with their primary care physician (PCP) who interrupts them within about 18 seconds and never fully listens to them. Patients are sent for tests, given a prescription or referred to the specialist even though the PCP could—with more time—have figured out the problem without a test, prescription or referral.
Time for payment models to stop discriminating against in-home care
Time for payment models to stop discriminating against in-home care
American healthcare delivery is seriously dysfunctional. It takes patients about three weeks to get a doctor’s appointment, they sit in the waiting room for a long time, get 10 to 12 minutes with the doctor and then have a hefty deductible and/or copay despite paying handsomely for insurance.
Solving the crisis in primary care
Direct pay models could buy physicians more time with patients to improve care and reset a fractured payment system.